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Practice Policies

Locked blue folderConfidentiality and Medical records

Introduction

Information about you and the care you receive is shared, in a secure system, by healthcare staff to support your treatment and care. It is important that we, the NHS, can use this information to plan and improve services for all patients. We would like to link information from all the different places where you receive care, such as your GP, hospital and community service, to help us provide a full picture. This will allow us to compare the care you received in one area against the care you received in another, so we can see what has worked best.

Information such as your postcode and NHS number, but not your name, will be used to link your records in a secure system, so your identity is protected. Information which does not reveal your identity can then be used by others, such as researchers and those planning health services, to make sure we provide the best care possible for everyone. How your information is used and shared is controlled by law and strict rules are in place to protect your privacy.

We need to make sure that you know this is happening and the choices you have

The practice complies with data protection and access to medical records legislation. Identifiable information about you will be shared with others in the following circumstances:

  • To provide further medical treatment for you e.g. from district nurses and hospital services.
  • To help you get other services e.g. from the social work department. This requires your consent.
  • When we have a duty to others e.g. in child protection cases anonymised patient information will also be used at local and national level to help the Health Board and Government plan services e.g. for diabetic care.

Do I have a choice?

Yes. You have the right to prevent confidential information about you from being shared or used for any purpose other than providing your care, except in special circumstances. If you do not want information that identifies you to be shared outside your GP practice, ask your practice to make a note of this in your medical record. This will prevent your confidential information being used other than where necessary by law, (for example, if there is a public health emergency).

You will also be able to restrict the use of information held by other places you receive care, such as hospitals and community services. You should let your GP know if you want to restrict the use of this information.

Your choice will not affect the care you receive.

If you want to opt out please ask at reception for a form.

Staff Access

Reception and administration staff require access to your medical records in order to do their jobs. These members of staff are bound by the same rules of confidentiality as the medical staff.

Freedom of Information

Information about the General Practitioners and the practice required for disclosure under this act can be made available to the public. All requests for such information should be made to the practice manager.

Access to Records

In accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998 and Access to Health Records Act, patients may request to see their medical records. Such requests should be made through the practice manager. No information will be released without the patient consent unless we are legally obliged to do so.

On Line Access- 30 March 2016

For the last year or so, patients have been able to order their prescriptions and book appointments on line using a secure link from our website.  From March 2016, you can also ask for access to certain parts of your medical records, including immunisations, problems, results etc.

Please ask at reception if you would like further information about this service. 


Customer service formComplaints

We make every effort to give the best service possible to everyone who attends our practice.

However, we are aware that things can go wrong resulting in a patient feeling that they have a genuine cause for complaint. If this is so, we would wish for the matter to be settled as quickly, and as amicably, as possible.

To pursue a complaint please contact the practice manager who will deal with your concerns appropriately. Further written information is available regarding the complaints procedure from reception.


Zero tolerance Policy                                                                                              

The NHS operate a zero tolerance policy with regard to violence and abuse and the practice has the right to remove violent patients from the list with immediate effect in order to safeguard practice staff, patients and other persons. Violence in this context includes actual or threatened physical violence or verbal abuse which leads to fear for a person’s safety. In this situation we will notify the patient in writing of their removal from the list and record in the patient’s medical records the fact of the removal and the circumstances leading to it.

Zero Tolerance Policy .doc

Changing Doctors and Policy on Removal of Patients from the Practice List

Patients are removed from the Practice List for the following reasons:

  • At the patient's request
  • Patients who move outside the Practice area or who already live outside the Practice area and move to any other address still outside the Practice area
  • Embarkation - Where a patient has moved abroad for a period of 3 months or more
  • Patients who do not attend 3 Practice appointments and who have been sent two advisory letters
  • Patients who are verbally or physically abusive to staff and patients
  • Where the doctor patient relationship has broken down and doctor feels unable to continue to treat you

Patients are informed in writing of the removal in all cases except when the patient has requested the removal or Embarkation


Generic Prescribing Policy

It is Practice policy to prescribe generically by a drug's chemical and not its' brand name.  This is done for reasons of safety and finance.  Drugs from the same group tend to have similar chemial names so it avoids errors and duplicate prescribing.  As a doctor or nurse it is obviously easier to learn the chemical name of a drug and not have to know several brand names for the same drug.  Prescribing genetic drugs means the NHS has more money to spend on other things.  The attached link explains why this is important and recommended as a national policy.  There are a few drugs among them such as slow release drugs for epilepsy where prescribing by brand name is recommended for technical reasons and these are the exception to the rule.


Symbol Error 3  Patient UK Leaflet on Generic vs Brand Names for Medicines

Chaperone Policy

Parsons Heath Medical Practice is committed to providing a safe, comfortable environment where patients and staff can be confident that best practice is being followed at all times and the safety of everyone is of paramount importance.

All patients are entitled to have a chaperone present for any consultation, examination or procedure where they feel one is required.  This chaperone may be a family member or friend.  On occasions you may prefer a formal chaperone to be present i.e. a trained member of staff.

Wherever possible we could ask you to make this request at the time of booking appointment so that arrangements can be made and your appointment is not delayed in any way.  Where this is not possible we will endeavour to provide a formal chaperone at the time of request.  However occasionally it may be necessary to reschedule your appointment.

Your healthcare professional may also require a chaperone to be present for certain consultations in accordance with out chaperone policy. 

If you have any questions or comments regarding this please contact the Practice Manager - Jackie Hawkins

 



 
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